U-M Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

U-M Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

You now have access to courses and events from across the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI). OLLI features lectures, courses, study groups, and other learning opportunities. Check out some of their latest events below!

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The University of Michigan Library Special Collections Research Center holds an extraordinary collection of artifacts, manuscripts, and early printed books illustrating the early history of western medicine. In an informal workshop setting, participants will learn about the birth and early development of western medicine through a close viewing of historical artifacts, including ancient papyri, medical amulets, medieval manuscripts, and richly illustrated Renaissance books. The workshop will pay special attention to the interplay between science and religion as well as to the role of art in disseminating medical knowledge.



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Author Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, a former Google data scientist, lecturer at the Wharton Business School, and NY Times opinion writer, draws this conclusion in the title book. He analyzed data derived from bits of information left on Google, social media, dating, and even porn sites, that reveal people’s personal truths. He maintains that Internet searches done in private and social media postings reveal what folks really think and that people lie to friends, lovers, surveys – even themselves. The author covers inner feelings on topics such as prejudice, hate, sex, abortion, how we fill our time, our Facebook friends, our communities, and many other subjects. He then covers what Big Data does well, does poorly, and what it should and shouldn’t be used for. We will read and discuss this book. The first session will cover the Foreward and Introduction (p. xi - 24).

Gerry Lapidus has lead over 50 OLLI book discussion groups on topics such as social science, politics, and religion.

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Now that it’s clear that efforts to deal with gerrymandering cannot be litigated in federal court, the question is whether state independent 
redistricting commissions are the best approach to the problem.  Another approach would be to adopt a state-wide list system of proportional representation, as described in Bob Davidow’s recent article in the Wayne Law Review.  With a state-wide system, there would be no district line to draw -- hence no gerrymandering. The proposed system would not only reduce the amount of money needed for election, but also reduce the influence of the wealthy and well-connected.  Demographic changes would not affect the operation of the system. An independent redistricting commission would do none of these things. Bob Davidow is Professor of Law (retired) from George Mason University. He is the author of Response to Gerrymandering.




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